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Here’s that hawthorn thorn comb I’d mentioned yesterday. Unfortunantly, that’s artificial sinew used in tying it up. It was all I had that I thought was both thin enough and strong enough to hold it together, but it turned out it didn’t need to be that strong so next time I’m using thinly spun wool instead. Seems to work well so far. The teeth are a little more than half an inch long. I brush the teeth against an abrasive stone to dull them a bit.

-mouse

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I was gathering mushrooms for supper a couple days ago when I came across this little girl. She was just sitting curled up under a spruce like little rabbits do, barely even moved when I scooped her up. I brought her inside and sat her down on my bed to take this picture, and she’s been living in my cabin since. I was planning on cooking her up with the mushrooms, but then I thought I’d give a try to taming her. It’s always fun to have wild animals that are friendly with you living nearby, you know? And even if you come to know the raven that always comes for your fish carcasses or the ermine that periodically clears out the family of shrews under your cabin (these are some of my neighbours), it’s a little different when they come up to you asking to be petted. Provided I can keep the dogs away from her once she’s back outside, that is. She does look awfully tasty though, mmm, snowshoe hare.

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I come across bones regiliarly while I’m out in the woods. I bring them back home to have them handy for various projects like sewing needles, knitting needles, or fishing hooks (I go through allot of fishing hooks). From left to right it’s piles of vertebrae, ribs, miscellanious jaws shoulder blades and hip bones, and leg bones. These all come from moose. Last night I found a very old carcass from a young calf killed by coyotes, which is what made me think to even take a picture of my bone pile in the first place. It’s just an everyday ordinary thing to me, I don’t usually realise how unusual that must be for people in the city.

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A sewing needle I made yesterday from my bone pile, for example. It’s wedge-shaped in its length because if you try to make them the same width all along their shaft they break much more often.

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A couple japanese knotweed containers. Very simple to make. I needed to make some more small things containers since I didn’t have anything to stick the hawthorn thorns I collected into, and those are the ones sticking out of the top container. Hawthorn thorns are all around generally useful. I usually use them as toothpicks, but they also make suitable awls or emergency sewing needles. My next project is to make a comb using dulled hawthorn thorns. I’ll post about it when I finish it. Speaking of dental hygeine though, hawthorn twigs also make an acceptable chewing stick, so I replenished my supply some at the same time.

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Blue bead lily berries, which supposedly make a blue dye. I’ve never seen them as plentiful as this year, so I decided to gather a pile for a friend to test out. Although, it could be that I’ve never seen them this plentiful because I’ve not really looked. The berries are inedible and have no other uses as far as I know, and the edible leaves have far gone by by the time the berries are out. On the right is a small handful of goldenthread rhizomes, which are a powerful antibiotic containing the same chemical as goldenseal. Goldenthread is much more common though. It also makes a bright yellow dye, or so I’ve heard. Need to get my friend to test this one too.

-mouse

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Some wool off my dogs. I’m using a crochet hook instead of a drop spindle because I’m not terribly good at spinning and the staple length for Samoyed wool is much shorter than sheep wool. Still, with a high twist count and double ply it’s really quite strong. And extremely soft and warm, much more than sheep wool.

There’s about 33 completed yards of yarn in that picure, and when I finished that pile of wool I had around 55. I’ve got one more pile that size to spin, then I’m saving up the wool to make a piece of clothing. From what I’ve heard, Samoyed wool is seven times warmer than sheep wool so they don’t recommend making clothing 100% out of it, so I figure it’ll make good Winter gear when it gets -40 out here in the Winter, eh?

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This is that blanket I took all those previous pictures on, it wasn’t finnished then but it is now.

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The Amaranth patch is doing well!

A couple good documentaries

An iron age reenacted village for a year;
http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=zRs-zRoBIc4

40 years of isolation in Patagonia;
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JZFp8ldcTx4

Wilderness village in the Ural mountains
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tt2AYafET68

Dick Proenik’s Alone in the Wild
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iYJKd0rkKss

Canadian documentary from 1953 on the Inuit;
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0qfxtMW66C8

The most remote family in Alaska;
http://m.youtube.com/watch?&v=Iq0rZn8HFmQ

The Zo’é tribe of Brazil;
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=–1AEHcLmuk