Why do weeds grow so well?

Domesticated crops are less hardy (in many senses of the term) because they have been bred too strongly in limited numbers of qualities. Weeds can survive better because they are not performing at their maximum at all times; the excess is security.

Say you have two plants, plant breed A has bred to have high seed production whereas plant breed B is wild. Both plants are injured, while they are in flower and have to allocate extra resources towards healing their injuries. Plant of breed B is able to divert some of its energy away from its flowers and all its other systems because it has a bit of excess to spare, and even though it produces less seed it still produces some. Plant of breed A has all of its energy going towards making flowers at the time it’s injured, and by diverting energy away from them it doesn’t have enough resources to support all its flowers and doesn’t make any seeds.

In the wild, breed B’s linneage would go on to outproduce all the plants in breed A for all the nutrients in the soil, but in captivity where larger seedheads are selected for the only plants that will continue to be planted by the gardener next year are those with the larger seedhead that were fortunant enough not to be injured. But this means that one event coming through, say a dog running through the garden, is enough to destroy the crop. Whereas the weeds capable of being plucked and cast off still reroot and grow to fruiting.

The model of morality to follow is that of a simple weed. Like water, weeds live in the places no one else wants, use the resources that remain untaken, and persist and subside.

-mouse

20130802_104029
Some wool off my dogs. I’m using a crochet hook instead of a drop spindle because I’m not terribly good at spinning and the staple length for Samoyed wool is much shorter than sheep wool. Still, with a high twist count and double ply it’s really quite strong. And extremely soft and warm, much more than sheep wool.

There’s about 33 completed yards of yarn in that picure, and when I finished that pile of wool I had around 55. I’ve got one more pile that size to spin, then I’m saving up the wool to make a piece of clothing. From what I’ve heard, Samoyed wool is seven times warmer than sheep wool so they don’t recommend making clothing 100% out of it, so I figure it’ll make good Winter gear when it gets -40 out here in the Winter, eh?

20130805_130553
This is that blanket I took all those previous pictures on, it wasn’t finnished then but it is now.

20130805_125620
The Amaranth patch is doing well!