The Too Sharp Sword

If you sharpen your sword constantly keeping it at its peak sharpness, the sword will wear down quickly and you will have to forge a new sword. But the opposite, of never resharpening and using a dull sword means while you may have the sword for longer it will eventually become so useless as to effectively be no sword. There is a balance to strike between the two, finding the perfect sharpness for the task.

The Too Sharp Sword is a maxim we use for describing how constant maintainance can lead to extra unnessessary work, a decrease in overall efficiency. The example goes that a blade kept too sharp will wear away quicker. You’ll need to reforge a new blade more often if you keep the edge constantly at its peak sharpness. While you may be able to get a finer cut with a sharper blade, past a certain point there is no increase in material benefit from finer sharpening.

A commercial knitting machine may be able to knit a finer cloth than knitting a garment by hand, but the time spent to build the machine would take longer than the time spent knitting any garment itself. And a very coarse and shoddily made hand knit fabric can be nearly as warm and comfortable, the increase is minimal.

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Things that do not change, have no meaning. Things that do not end, have no value.

If a process were to last forever, a point in the future would inevitably come where due to the intermediary buildup the actions of what is currently the present are untraceable to the conditions at that future point.

And in a real process, one which must end, the actions during it’s existence have no effect on the final outcome. This is indistinguishable from a process without end.

A universe without value is self-contradictory. Rules without action are not rules.

Without some process to act, value cannot apply to system.

Thus, any set of value cannot violate the preliminary requirements for there to exist value. This, in itself, is valuable.